Maritime Water Risks
Passengers and crew on ships are potentially at risk of exposure to Legionella bacteria contaminating water supplies in the same way as guests and staff in a hotel are at risk. Examples of sources include potable water, water for washing, showers and baths, water in spa pools, etc., and fire hydrants.
 
However, on board ship there are added complications. The risk may be greater because the water has to be taken on board and stored (bunkered). This makes it important that the source and quality of the water taken on board is known, although this may not always be possible in some countries.
 
Conditions for storage of water on board ship are important, especially as they may be affected by temperature extremes when traveling in tropical regions. Any of the above factors are exacerbated because on longer journeys people will be on board continually for extended periods and therefore there is the greater potential for exposure to any contamination.
 
A further complication is that the regulations that normally apply to mainland buildings do not necessarily apply to ships, because they do not have jurisdiction. The shipping company may nonetheless be held accountable for the impacts to health for all who become sick from legionella infection on their ships. 
 
Play it safe: Test, treat, reduce aerosol generation, and repeat at regular intervals. Keeping good records of your water treatment plan will give you the confidence to return to business.
 
Play it safe: Test, treat, reduce aerosol generation, and repeat at regular intervals. Keeping good records of your water treatment plan will give you the confidence to return to business.